Can NaMo solve Bangalore’s garbage problem?

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To the eternal mortification of the naysayers, Narendra Damodardas Modi has won an admirable election for the BJP and is now firmly installed as the 15th prime minister of India. As an example of one man single-mindedly pursuing his goal and achieving it against a mountain of opposition this is success nonpareil.

churumuri is happy to be proven spectacularly wrong—and humbled. Somewhat.

That said, the difficult part is meeting the ocean of expectations that Modi channelised into his victory. In urging voters to vote for him by voting for BJP candidates, Modi deftly turned a parliamentary election into a presidential one, in which all the nation’s hopes were somewhat irrationally invested in one man.

As if members of Parliament don’t count.

As if members of Legislature don’t count.

As if members of city corporations don’t count.

A good test of the new prime minister’s supposedly omniscient powers and abilities is in supposedly “high-tech” Bangalore, where sights such these is today commonplace in a City governed by the prime minister’s party; in a State governed by the Congress.

Is it reasonable to expect a “municipal” problem to be solved by the PM, whose MPs also represent the City? If yes, how precisely would Narendra Modi go about this? And how many days should it take for “Achche Din” to dawn on the hapless residents of Bangalore who voted for him and his party?